20 JANUARY IN PARDON HISTORY
20 January 2001: Clinton pardons 151 persons
      Two hours before the presidency passes to G. W. Bush, US President Clinton pardons 151 persons. They include a leftist radical convicted of conspiring to bomb the U.S. Capitol; a woman who illegally gave an eagle feather to now-Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.); some drug offenders serving long prison terms under mandatory sentencing lawso and:
  • Roger Clinton, Bill Clinton's under-achieving half brother, who was sentenced to two years in prison after pleading guilty in 1985 to conspiring to distribute cocaine. He cooperated with authorities and testified against other drug defendants. He has since focused on an entertainment career.
  • Susan McDougal, his Whitewater business partner, who went to prison rather than give testimony about the president sought by Whitewater prosecutors. McDougal was convicted of fraud along with her ex-husband, the late failed savings and loan owner James McDougal, in a 1996 trial at which Clinton testified by videotape. She only served 3 1/2 months of a two-year prison term for her four felony convictions before a federal judge released her because of a back problem. But her freedom was short-lived. She defied a judge's order to answer Whitewater prosecutor's questions before a federal grand jury and was returned to jail for 18 months for civil contempt. A frequent defender of Clinton, she often appeared on television in an orange prison jumpsuit to accuse Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr of being on a political vendetta to “get Clinton” — a charge Starr denied.
  • Patty Hearst, who, in the 1970s, as a 19-year-old heiress, was kidnapped by the radical “Symbionese Liberation Army” gang, which she then joined and participated with them in a bank holdup in San Francisco, for which she was sent to prison. Her prison term was cut short by President Carter, but her convictions remained on record until Clinton's pardon. She is married to her former bodyguard, Bernard Shaw.
  • John Deutch, ex-CIA director , who had been discussing a possible plea deal with Justice Department prosecutors to settle allegations he mishandled classified government information. He had written and stored highly classified intelligence reports on home computers linked to the Internet. Deutch apologized.
  • Henry Cisneros, Clinton's first housing secretary. He resigned in 1996 amid an investigation into allegations that he lied to the FBI about payments he made to a former mistress, Linda Medlar Jones. In 1999, he pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge. Since leaving office, Cisneros served as head of Univision, the nation's largest Spanish-language television network. In 2000, he returned to his native San Antonio to launch an organization to provide housing for low-income families.
  • Linda Jones, political fundraiser, Cisneros's former mistress.
  • Fife Symington, former Arizona Republican governor, convicted in 1997 on six of counts of bank and wire fraud, later overturned on appeal, but prosecutors were trying to reinstate the criminal charges.
  • Samuel Loring Morison, a former Naval intelligence employee who was convicted of espionage and theft for leaking classified photographs of Soviet facilities to a military magazine. Morision, a descendant of a prominent Boston family and grandson of the U.S. Navy's foremost historian, Samuel Eliot Morison, was convicted in October 1985 and was sentenced to two years in prison.
  • Marc Rich, 67, a billionaire commodities trader, who, with Pincus Green, was indicted in 1983 on charges of tax fraud and illegal oil trading with Iran. They fled the US for Switzerland (which does not extradite for tax evasion), and were never brought to trial. Rich became a citizen of Spain. This pardon is the most controversial, as Rich's former wife, Denise Rich, alledgedly was “paid for it” with $867'000 in contributions to Democratic causes, including Hillary Clinton's successful senatorial campaign in New York state. Defenders of Rich said the case against him was unfairly hyped by then-U.S. Attorney Rudolph Giuliani (Republican candidate for the same senate seat as Hillary Clinton, until he withdrew for health reasons), now mayor of New York. They denied government charges that Rich evaded about $48 million in income taxes, and they pointed out that his company had agreed to pay the government $150 million in fines before Rich fled to Switzerland.
  • Pincus Green, a former business associate of Rich..
  • Stephen A. Smith, a former aide to Clinton when he was governor of Arkansas who pleaded guilty to misusing a loan (Whitewater affair)
  • Robert W. Palmer, a Little Rock appraiser who pleaded guilty to conspiracy (Whitewater affair).

    Clinton, also commutes the sentences of 36 people. They include the death sentence of
  • David Ronald Chandler, commuted to life in prison without parole. Marijuana trafficker Chandler, is on death row in Terre Haute, Indiana, for arranging the murder of a police informer. The main witness in the case against Chandler recanted his testimony and acknowledged committing the murder himself.
    and the prison sentences of:
  • Peter MacDonald, 72, former Navajo leader, who has been in a Fort Worth, Texas, medical prison since 1992. He was one of the famed Navajos used by the U.S. military during World War II to stump the Japanese by using their native tongue as a communications code. He later rose to chairman of America's largest Native American tribe — a passionate orator who sharply criticized the federal government for threatening tribal sovereignty. But MacDonald was removed from office for taking bribes and kickbacks. Two of his supporters were killed on 20 July 1989 by tribal police, during a march to protest what they considered a coup against their leader. MacDonald has been serving a 14-year sentence for inciting the deadly riot.
  • Melvin J. Reynolds, former Democrat Chicago area US Representative. He resigned from Congress after being convicted in 1995 of having sex with an underage campaign worker. He later was sentenced to 6 1/2 years in prison after being convicted of federal charges of bank fraud, campaign violations and conspiracy.
  • Linda Sue Evans and Susan Rosenberg, ensnared in a conspiracy to stage a bombing at the U.S. Capitol in 1983 to protest the U.S. invasion of Grenada.
  • Derrick Curry, a Prince George's County man, who was arrested in a drug sting in 1990. Although he had never been arrested before, had served mainly as a delivery boy for a drug dealer and was found with only a pound of drugs, he was convicted of conspiracy and distribution of crack cocaine. He was sentenced to nearly 20 years in prison, with no possibility of parole. His case had attracted support from critics of the federal government's arbitrary crack cocaine sentencing mandates.
  • Antoinette M. Frink, 49, former owner of a car dealership in Delaware, Ohio, who is freed from a federal women's prison in Lexington, Kentucky, after serving 11 years of a 15 1/2-year sentence for selling cars to a drug trafficker who used them to run cocaine. Co-defendants had received sentences ranging from six months to six years after cooperating with authorities.
  • Susan Rosenberg, a member of the radical group, the Weather Underground, who was charged with conspiracy in the 1981 robbery of a Brink's armored truck in New York, during which two police officers and a security guard were killed.
  • Linda Sue Evans, who was serving a 40-year sentence for her role in a 1983 bombing attempt on the U.S. Capitol.
  • Benjamin Berger, Kalmen Stern, Jacob Elbaum, and David Goldstein, leaders of the Hasidic community of New Square in Rockland County NY (which voted 1400 to 12 for Hillary Clinton), accused of defrauding the government out of millions in education, housing and business loans and grants (with a bogus school). They faced long prison terms.
  • Ronald Henderson Blackley, who had been chief of staff of former agriculture secretary Mike Espy. Espy was acquitted of accepting illegal gifts, but independent counsel Donald Smaltz's obtained conviction of a number of his associates. Blackey's 27-month sentence was for making false statements regarding $22'000 which he accepted from agribusiness friends. Also pardoned are four others convicted of lesser offenses linked to the Espy probe.

    The list also is notable for those it does not include:
  • Webster Hubbell, a former law partner of Hillary Rodham Clinton convicted in the Whitewater investigation, who had not sought a pardon. Hubbell, the former number three Justice Department official, first came to Starr's attention during the independent counsel's investigation of the Whitewater land deal and other business matters in Arkansas. He spent 18 months in prison after pleading guilty in 1994 to embezzling from clients and partners of the Rose Law Firm, the Little Rock law office where he worked with Hillary Clinton. As part of that plea, he agreed to cooperate with Starr. But Starr and his aides were not satisfied that Hubbell told them everything he knew about Whitewater and other issues, and Hubbell's trouble continued.
  • Jim Guy Tucker, former Arkansas governor, involved in Whitewater. Tucker, who underwent a liver transplant in 1997, pleaded guilty to fraud in a second case involving a cable television company. Tucker was accused of creating a sham bankruptcy to avoid paying taxes on profits when the company was sold.
  • Jonathan Pollard, a former Navy analyst imprisoned for spying for Israel;
  • Michael Milken, one-time Wall Street financier
  • Harrison Williams, former senator and Abscam figure
  • Leonard Peltier, Amerindian activist convicted of killing two FBI agents on an Indian reservation in 1975.

    The Constitution gives presidents unlimited power to pardon or officially forgive criminal wrongdoing. Pardons do not expunge convictions but can be used to restore any civil rights that were lost as a result. The overwhelming majority of pardon requests are channeled through the Justice Department, which has its own Office of the Pardon Attorney that aids presidents in making decisions. The pardon attorney's office reviews requests, conducts investigations and makes recommendations. But the law permits presidents to act on their own as well, without Justice Department input.

    COMPLETE LIST:
  • PARDONS
  • ALLEN, Verla Jean
  • ALTIERE, Nicholas M.
  • ALTSCHUL, Bernice Ruth
  • ANDERSON, Joe, Jr.
  • ANDERSON, William Sterling
  • AZIZKHANI, Mansour T.
  • BABIN, Cleveland Victor, Jr.
  • BAGLEY, Chris Harmon
  • BANE, Scott Lynn
  • BARBER, Thomas Cleveland
  • BARGON, Peggy Ann
  • BLAMPIED, David Roscoe
  • BORDERS, William Arthur, Jr.
  • BOREL, Arthur David
  • BOREL, Douglas Charles
  • BRABHAM, George Thomas
  • BRASWELL, Almon Glenn
  • BROWDER, Leonard
  • BROWN, David Steven
  • BURLESON, Delores Caroylene, aka Delores Cox Burleson
  • BUSTAMANTE, John H.
  • CAMPBELL, Mary Louise
  • CANDELARIA, Eloida
  • CAPILI, Dennis Sobrevinas
  • CHAMBERS, Donna Denise
  • CHAPMAN, Douglas Eugene
  • CHAPMAN, Ronald Keith
  • CHAVEZ, Francisco Larios
  • CISNEROS, Henry G.
  • CLINTON, Roger
  • COHN, Stuart Harris
  • COOPER, David Marc
  • COX, Ernest Harley, Jr.
  • CROSS, John F., Jr.
  • CUNNINGHAM, Rickey Lee
  • DE LABIO, Richard Anthony
  • DEUTCH, John
  • DOUGLAS, Richard
  • DOWNE, Edward Reynolds
  • DUDLEY, Marvin Dean
  • DUNCAN, Larry Lee
  • FAIN, Robert Clinton
  • FERNANDEZ, Marcos Arcenio
  • FERROUILLET, Alvarez
  • FUGAZY, William Denis
  • GEORGE, Lloyd Reid
  • GOLDSTEIN, Louis
  • GORDON, Rubye Lee
  • GREEN, Pincus
  • HAMNER, Robert Ivey
  • HANDLEY, Samuel Price
  • HANDLEY, Woodie Randolph
  • HARMON, Jay Houston
  • HEMMINGSON, John
  • HERDLINGER, David S.
  • HUCKLEBERRY, Debi Rae
  • JAMES, Donald Ray
  • JOBE, Stanley Pruet
  • JOHNSON, Ruben H.
  • JONES, Linda
  • LAKE, James Howard
  • LEWIS, June Louise
  • LEWIS, Salim Bonnor
  • LODWICK, John Leighton
  • LOPEZ, Hildebrando
  • LUACES, Jose Julio
  • MANESS, James Timothy
  • MANNING, James Lowell
  • MARTIN, John Robert
  • MARTINEZ, Frank Ayala
  • MARTINEZ, Silvia Leticia Beltran
  • McCORMICK, John Francis
  • McDOUGAL, Susan H.
  • MECHANIC, Howard Lawrence
  • MITCHELL, Brook K., Sr.
  • MORISON, Samuel Loring
  • MORGAN, Charles Wilfred, III
  • NAZZARO, Richard Anthony
  • NOSENKO, Charlene Ann
  • OBERMEIER, Vernon Raymond
  • OGALDE, Miguelina
  • OWEN, David C.
  • PALMER, Robert W.
  • PERHOSKY, Kelli Anne
  • PEZZOPANE, Richard H.
  • PHILLIPS, Orville Rex
  • POLING, Vinson Stewart, Jr.
  • PROUSE, Norman Lyle
  • PRUITT, Willie H. H., Jr.
  • PURSLEY, Danny Martin, Sr.
  • RAVENEL, Charles D.
  • RAY, William Clyde
  • REGALADO, Alfredo Luna
  • RICAFORT, Ildefonso Reynes
  • RICH, Marc
  • RIDDLE, Howard Winfield
  • RILEY, Richard Wilson, Jr.
  • ROBBINS, Samuel Lee
  • RODRIGUEZ, Joel Gonzales
  • ROGERS, Michael James
  • ROSS, Anna Louise
  • RUST, Gerald Glen
  • RUST, Jerri Ann
  • RUTHERFORD, Bettye June
  • SANDS, Gregory Lee
  • SCHWIMMER, Adolph
  • SERETTI, Albert A., Jr.
  • SHAW, Patricia Campbell Hearst
  • SMITH, Dennis Joseph
  • SMITH, Gerald Owen
  • SMITH, Stephen A.
  • SPEAKE, Jimmie Lee
  • STEWART, Charles Bernard
  • STEWART-ROLLINS, Marlena Francisca
  • SYMINGTON, John Fife, III
  • TANNEHILL, Richard Lee
  • TENAGLIA, Nicholas C.
  • THOMAS, Gary Allen
  • TODD, Larry Weldon
  • TREVINO, Olga C.
  • VAMVOUKLIS, Ignatious
  • VAN DE WEERD, Patricia A.
  • WADE, Christopher V.
  • WARMATH, Bill Wayne
  • WATSON, Jack Kenneth
  • WEBB, Donna Lynn
  • WELLS, Donald William
  • WENDT, Robert H.
  • WILLIAMS, Jack L.
  • WILLIAMS, Kevin Arthur
  • WILLIAMS, Robert Michael
  • WILSON, Jimmie Lee
  • WINGATE, Thelma Louise
  • WOOD, Mitchell Couey
  • WOOD, Warren Stannard
  • WORTHEY, Dewey
  • YALE, Rick Allen
  • YASAK, Joseph A.
  • YINGLING, William Stanley
  • YOUNG, Phillip David
    COMMUTATIONS
  • BERGER, Benjamin
  • BLACKLEY, Ronald Henderson
  • BOLAN, Bert Wayne
  • CAMARGO, Gloria Libia
  • CAMPBELL, Charles F.
  • CHANDLER, David Ronald
  • CHIN, Lau Ching
  • CLARK, Donald R.
  • COFFMAN, Loreta De-Ann
  • CURRY, Derrick
  • DESALUS, Velinda
  • ELBAUM, Jacob
  • EVANS, Linda Sue
  • FISH, Loretta Sharon
  • FRINK, Antoinette M.
  • GOLDSTEIN, David
  • GREENFIELD, Gerard A.
  • ISRAEL, Jodie E.
  • JOHNSON, Kimberly D.
  • LANGSTON, Billy Thornton, Jr.
  • LUMPKIN, Belinda Lynn
  • MACDONALD, Peter
  • MANN, Kellie Ann
  • NINEMIRE, Peter
  • PADMORE, Hugh Ricardo
  • PROSPERI, Arnold Paul
  • REYNOLDS, Melvin J.
  • RIVEIRO, Pedro Miguel
  • RIVERS, Dorothy
  • ROSENBERG, Susan
  • STERN, Kalmen
  • STRINGFELLOW, Cory
  • VIGNALI, Carlos Anibal, Jr.
  • WADDELL, III, Thomas Wilson
  • WEINIG, Harvey
  • WILLIS, Kim Allen
  • TO THE TOP
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