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DEATHS: 1971 MOSSA — 1924 POPOVA 1648 LE NAIN 
BIRTHS: 1616 DOLCI — 1817 SPRINGER — 1764 VAN DAEL
^ Born on 25 May 1616: Carlo “Carlino” Dolci, Florentine Baroque painter who died on 17 January 1686. He was the cousin of Onorio Marinari.
— Carlo Dolci, allievo di Jacopo Vignali, eseguì a diciassette anni il bel ritratto di Ainolfo de' Bardi, volgendosi poi a dipingere soggetti sacri.
— Dolci was the leading painter in Florence in the mid-17th century, and an exponent of the restrained style of Late Baroque comparable with Sacchi's Roman works. Dolci was extremely precocious and one of his finest pictures is the portrait, painted when he was 16, of Fra Ainolfo dei Bardi (1632). Nevertheless, he later became very neurotic and felt himself to be professionally inadequate. Most of his later works are small devotional pictures often painted on copper in an extremely finicky and detailed manner. When Giordano was in Florence in 1682 he said jokingly that his own virtuoso style had brought him a fortune of 150,000 scudi, but that by spending so much time on his works Dolci would starve; an idea that preyed on Dolci's mind. One of his best works is the Martyrdom of Saint Andrew (1646).
— Dolci was the major Florentine painter of the 17th century. He enjoyed an international reputation in his own lifetime. He was a gifted portrait painter and painted a number of large altarpieces, but his reputation is largely based on his half-length, single-figure paintings, characterized by their intense religiosity and meticulous technique. His mature style was complex and sophisticated. Intended for cultivated and aristocratic circles, his was never a popular art in any sense. Dolci’s disturbed personality — full of tormented fantasy and dark fantasms — is evident throughout his work after the later 1640s.

LINKS
Self-Portrait (1674)
Christ Instituting the Eucharist at the Last Supper (34x26cm)
The Angel of the Annunciation (1655, 52x40cm)
The Virgin of the Annunciation (1655, 52x40cm)
Flowers (1675)
Ainolfo de' Bardi (1632, 150x119cm) _ This portrait was painted by Dolci at age 16, as appears from an inscription on the back; and it surpasses, both for the conception and the success and brilliance of the execution, later pictures by this precocious artist. Fra Ainolfo de' Bardi, Knight of Jerusalem, was a very notable soldier and man of politics in his day. He was born in 1573 and died in 1638.
Magdalene (1670, 73x56cm) _ This is among the most admired works of Carlo Dolci.
Saint John the Evangelist (600x360pix)
 
^ Died on 25 May 1971: Gustave-Adolphe Mossa, Nice French Symbolist artist and playwright born on 28 January 1883.
— Son of Alexis Mossa, artist and French and “Nissard” writer, he studied at the National School of Decorative Arts of Nice (1897-1898). Together with his father, he painted a large number of landscapes of Nice, at the same time he began to write fanciful comedies. From 1904 and for about fifteen years, he has been a brilliant representative of symbolism : pictorial realizations, essentially watercolors, which translated a personal crisis through a striking reinterpretation of ancient myths or of biblical episodes. The same aesthetics to serve the same theme (femme fatale, war of the sexes, “dismal Eros”, artists victims of a materialist and unsympathetic society), the same figures (Salomé, Pierrot...) expressed itself in numerous literary essays, essentially dramatic essays, all remained unpublished. He began his period of creative activity in Nice and pursued it in the Paris region with Charlotte-Andrée Naudin, whom he married in 1908.
      He intended to adapt for the theater simultaneously famous texts (Gulliver, the Divine comedy, etc.) and painters' lives (Lucas de Leyde, in 1903, Goya, Watteau, Botticelli, in 1914, etc.). Having discovered in Brugge in 1911 Gothic art and the sacred paintings of the Flemish Masters, he evolved towards the art of the former "painters of popular pictures”. His meeting with the poet René d' Helbingue [1882-1969], who will be a faithful friend, the cruel experience of war (he was injured in Ypres in November 1914), the progressive disappearance of his neurosis, the breaking off with his first wife and his remarriage (1918) were so many steps on the way to his spectacular transformation. He has drawn models of carnival floats since 1902 and will continue till his death.
      In the literary field, he returned to the fanciful inspiration of his youth, he was interested in Rabelais, in La Fontaine, in Boccacio, he returned to optimism and rediscovered the popular and regional culture which ended in the writing, in association with his friend Barthélemy Marengo, of a pastoral in “nissart” language, Lou Nouvé o sia lou pantai de Barb' Anto ( 1922 ). This play gave the signal of the renewal of the dialectal theater. The success encouraged him to adapt for the theater Nemaïda de Rancher ( 1923 ), then to create and manage Lou Teatre de Barba Martin. Until 1940 the company performed his dialectal comedies (Phygaço, in 1924, La Tina, in 1926, L’Anticari, in 1933, Lou Rei Carneval, in 1935) which were characterized by their humor, their dramaturgic qualities and the richness of their traditional themes.
      Mossa, who became curator of the Museum of Fine art of Nice in 1927, led from 1913 till 1940 a career of illustrator of books and luxury reviews of international reputation. From the Second World war till his death, he dedicated himself especially to his “painter of popular pictures” works on the City of Nice, illustrating official documents, drawing armorial bearings and traditional suits of the County, but never interrupted his plentiful production of figurative watercolors dedicated to the landscapes of the region. In the pictorial domain, Mossa brought to the finishing symbolism an exceptional contribution; on the dramatic ground, he was one of the striking personalities of the theater in the language of Oc in the interwar period.

LINKS
Self-Portrait
Woman of Fashion and Jockey (1906; 1000x780pix, 212kb)
Pierrot s'en va (1906; 768x600pix, 43kb)
Elle (1905, 78x62cm; 900x600pix, 42kb)
La sirène repue (1905; 925x600pix, 81kb)
Mary de Magdala (1907; 991x600pix, 61kb)
Le baiser d'Hélène (1905; 855x600pix, 78kb)
Le foetus (1905; 1080x600pix, 112kb)
Valse macabre (1905; 1007x600pix, 92kb)
Dalila s'amuse (1905; 671x918pix, 122kb)
Les Parques (1905; 930x600pix, 104kb)
— a different Les Parques (1917; 392x640pix, 25kb)
Circe half-covered with pigs (700x543pix, 76kb _ ZOOM to 1050x815pix, 83kb) _ According to Greek legend (see Ovid Metamorphoses XIV 223-319), she could change humans into lions, wolves, bears or, as she did to the companions of Odysseus, pigs. However Odysseus himself was immune, thanks to the herb moly which Hermes had given him, and he compelled Circe to change the pigs back into men.
     _ See also the paintings: Circe with a drink (intended to transform Odysseus into a pig) and just one pig (1891, 149x92cm; 1000x596pix, 287kb _ ZOOMable to 2858x1703pix, 1457kb) by Waterhouse [06 Apr 1849 – 10 Feb 1917] and
     _ Circe bare-breasted, among lions into which she has changed some humans (1890, 138x200; 425x602pix, 80kb) by Barker [1863 – 10 Mar 1941].
David and Bathsheba (394x311pix, 33kb)
Hamlet, the Ghost (1908; 550x328pix, 35kb)
— Illustrations (very small) of 1927 to the short story Hérodias (1877) by Flaubert [12 Dec 1821 – 08 May 1880].
 
^ >Born on 25 May 1817: Cornelis Springer, Dutch painter and printmaker who died on 20 (18?) February 1891.
— As the son of a carpenter he was initially destined to become a house painter. After primary school he served an apprenticeship with the house and carriage painter Andries de Wit. His eldest brother, Hendrik Springer [1805–1867], an architect, taught him architectural and perspective drawing. From 1827 Cornelis was registered at the Amsterdam Akademie voor Beeldende Kunsten, where he worked under Jacobus van der Stok [1795–1864] and Herman Gerrit ten Cate [1803–1856].
      At the age of 17 Springer entered the Exhibition of Work by Living Masters (1834) in Amsterdam and continued to exhibit there until 1890, sending more than 120 paintings in all. In 1835 he studied under the architectural painter Kaspar Karssen [1810–1896]. From him he learnt how to paint, in a conventional Dutch manner, entirely or partially imaginary townscapes of warmly-lit 17th-century buildings, a genre that was to dominate his output until the mid-1850s (e.g. The Walburgis Church in Arnhem, 1841)
— Cornelis Springer learned the art of painting under Hendrik Gerrit ten Cate and later under Kaspar Karsen. He soon began to concentrate on townscapes. Springer spnet most of his life in Amsterdam, although he travelled throughout the Netherlands to draw his sketches. These he later incorporated into his studio work: townscapes in which he generally remained true to life, except for one or two details. Springer was especially celebrated for his numerous depictions of town halls in Dutch cities and the large canvas he painted together with Karsen for the Rembrandt anniversary festival in Amsterdam, View of The Hague from the Delftse Vaart in the 17th Century.
— Johan Conrad Greive [02 April 1837 – 14 May 1891] was a student of Springer.

LINKS
View of The Hague from the Delftse Vaart in the 17th Century (1852, 200x340cm) _ This was painted for the Rembrandt Festival surrounding the unveiling of Royer's statue of Rembrandt in 1852. Various artists produced pieces for the accompanying exhibition in Amsterdam's Park Hall, where the festivities took place. Springer was commissioned in February 1852 to paint a View of The Hague, as it must have looked in the seventeenth century. It was one of the cities in which Rembrandt once worked. In order to complete the work on time for the exhibition Springer asked for the collaboration of his former teacher, Kaspar Karsen.
      The work is painted with a quick brushstroke and bright, cheerful colors. In this townscape, the city lies in the background, the focus is on the cloudy sky - painted with broad, visible brushstrokes - and the countryside around the city: the wooden mills, the reflection in the water and the barge in the canal, towed by the horse on the towpath. On the grass just outside the city, white sheets, depicted with slight touches of white impasto paint, are bleaching in the sunshine.
      To show The Hague as it was in seventeenth century as accurately as possible, Springer and Karsen probably used a contemporary print of the city. The city's skyline is a reasonable reflection of the historical reality. The tower of the Great or Saint Jacob's Church is realistically painted and recognizable on the right is the Knight's Hall. The artists added a few figures in seventeenth-century dress to the townscape. One detail is wrong. The two mills are shown as simple timber postmills, although brick polder windmills had stood on the site since the seventeenth century. In their attempt to depict the city as an old-fashioned town, the artists went just a little too far.
     Springer made a small preliminary oil sketch study for View of the Hague (48x58cm). The final painting is much bigger, of a more elongated format, some of the details are different, and the barge livens up the scene. Otherwise it is almost identical.
Zuiderhavendijk, Enkhuizen (1868, 50x65cm) _ An everyday scene by a canal in the North Holland town of Enkhuizen: people walking along the street, poultry, dogs and a horse. A peasant leads his horse and the woman on the right sells vegetables from a stall. Cornelis Springer, was a specialist in townscapes. He aimed as far as possible to portray exactly what he saw, painting with a fine brush to obtain the utmost precision. Each leaf and each brick is minutely defined.
View of Montelspran (1845, 80x99cm)
–- View of Lübeck Market (1870, 102x142cm; 1148x1575pix, 139kb) _ From the seventeenth century onwards, Dutch painting became distinguished for its detailed, picturesque town views. Originating in the work of Gerrit Berckheyde and Jan van der Heyden, the genre reached another level of perfection in the magnificently detailed pictures of Cornelis Springer. Springer enjoyed esteem both in Holland and abroad during his lifetime and often painted particular views on commission from wealthy patrons. His lively, picturesque town views were so much in demand that they were ordered two to three years in advance. Lübeck – the former capital of the Hanseatic League of cities – was founded in the 12th century and prospered until the 16th century growing into one of the most important trading centers in Northern Europe. The old city consisted mainly of 15th- and 16th-century patrician residences, public monuments such as the church and famous Holstentor brick gate, and salt storehouses, with the town hall and market place, as the economic and social heart of the city, at its center. The Backstein Gotik (red brick gothic) of Hanseatic cities such as Lübeck must surely have caught Springer’s imagination. As early as 1864 he had painted a view of the market place of Bremen, and views of other German cities such as Ulm, Münster, Goslar, and Braunschweig soon followed. Springer, the son of the Amsterdam building contractor Willem Springer, had a solid knowledge of architecture. His eldest brother Hendrik, a professional architect, taught him architectural drawing and perspective. From this he profited throughout his career. As in the present work, Springer’s town views usually depict an immediately recognizable part of town, rendered with a fine eye for historic and architectural detail. Richly decorated façades in particular furnished him with opportunities to show off his painterly skills. He generally populated his works with many figures to bring the views alive, while the masterful interplay of sun and shade added depth and atmosphere. The close attention to detail of the architecture, the many figures populating the street and the well considered play of light in View of Lübeck Market confirm Springer’s reputation as one of the most celebrated Dutch painters of his time.
Gezicht op de St. Bavo en de Vleeshal te Haarlem (1855, 82x102cm; 400x500pix, 70kb) _ Het genre schilderkunst dat Springer beoefende, wortelde in de tweede helft van de zeventiende eeuw. In die tijd ontstond het topografisch georiënteerde stadsgezicht. Springer schilderde veel schijnbaar exacte weergaves van een gebouw of stadsdeel. Toch schroomde hij niet om wijzigingen aan te brengen die niet klopten met de werkelijkheid, wanneer dat de compositie ten goede kwam. Soms veranderde hij de positie van een gebouw, of werden bepaalde elementen van een bouwwerk samengevoegd. Vergeleken met de koele, realistische stadsschilderingen van Jan Weissenbruch is Springers werk romantischer, onder andere door de vele mensfiguurtjes.
–(080524)
^ Died on 25 May 1924: Liubov' Sergeyevna Popova, Muscovite Constructivist painter and designer born on 24 April 1889.
— She worked with Vladimir Tatlin, in Moscow early in the 20th century and visited Paris and Italy in 1911 and 1912. She was primarily a cubist painter but she also designed textiles, dresses, books, costumes, and theater sets.
— Popova was born into a wealthy family and trained as a teacher before beginning her artistic studies with Stanislav Zhukovsky [1873–1944] and Konstantin Yuon. Their influence, particularly through their interest in luminous tonalities reminiscent of Impressionism, can be seen in early works by Popova such as Still-life with Basket of Fruit (1908). Popova traveled extensively: in Kiev (1909) she was very impressed by the religious works of Mikhail Vrubel'; in Italy (1910) she admired Renaissance art, especially the paintings of Giotto. Between 1910 and 1911 she toured many parts of Russia, including Suzdal', Novgorod, Yaroslavl' and Pskov. Inspired by Russian architecture, frescoes and icons, she developed a less naturalistic approach. A more crucial influence was the first-hand knowledge of Cubism that she gained in Paris, which she visited with Nadezhda Udal'tsova during the winter of 1912–13. She studied at the Académie de la Palette, under the direction of Henri Le Fauconnier and Jean Metzinger, and her paintings of this time clearly display the influence of these artists (e.g. Two Figures, 1914). Numerous sketchbooks attest to the rigor with which Popova applied Cubist analysis to the human figure. This approach was extended to paintings, for example Seated Figure (1914), which has affinities with work by Léger and the Italian Futurist Umberto Boccioni; here, Popova shows a new confidence and fluency, and a more sophisticated integration of form and space into the transparent structures of curved and rectilinear planes. A more complex and dynamic fragmentation appears in canvases such as Traveling Woman (1915)
— Popova was born near Moscow. After graduating from the Arseniev Gymnasium, she studied art with Stanislav Zhukovsky in 1907 and with Konstantin Yuon and Ivan Dudin in 1908. In the course of travels from 1909 to 1911, she saw Mikhail Vrubel’s work in Kiev, ancient Russian churches and icons in Pskov and Novgorod, and early Renaissance art in Italy. In 1912, Popova worked at the Tower, a Moscow studio, with Vladimir Tatlin and other artists. That winter, she visited Paris, where she studied under Henri Le Fauconnier, Jean Metzinger, and André Dunoyer de Segonzac at La Palette. In 1913, Popova returned to Russia, but the following year she journeyed again to France and to Italy, where she gained familiarity with Futurism.
      In her work of 1912 to 1915, Popova was concerned with Cubist form and the representation of movement; after 1915, her nonrepresentational style revealed the influence of icon painting. She participated in many exhibitions of advanced art in Russia during this period: the Jack of Diamonds shows of 1914 and 1916 in Moscow; Tramway V: First Futurist Exhibition of Paintings and 0.10: The Last Futurist Exhibition, both in 1915 in St. Petersburg; The Store in 1916, Fifth State Exhibition: From Impressionism to Nonobjective Art in 1918–1919, and Tenth State Exhibition: Non-Objective Creativity and Suprematism in 1919, all in Moscow. In 1916, Popova joined the Supremus group, which was organized by Kazimir Malevich [26 Feb 1878 – 15 May 1935]. She taught at Svomas and Vkhutemas from 1918 onward and was a member of Inkhuk from 1920 to 1923.
      The artist participated in the 5 x 5 = 25 exhibition in Moscow in 1921 and in the Erste russische Kunstausstellung, held under the auspices of the Russian government at the Galerie van Diemen in Berlin in 1922. In 1921, Popova turned away from studio painting to produce utilitarian Productivist art: she designed textiles, dresses, books, porcelain, costumes, and theater sets (the latter for Vsevolod Meierkhold’s productions of Fernand Crommelynk’s The Magnanimous Cuckold, 1922, and Serge Tretiakov’s Earth on End, 1923). Popova died in Moscow.
— The artists of the Russian avant-garde were distinguished from their Western counterparts in many ways, particularly in the extraordinary number of women in their ranks who were responsible for discovering new bases of artistic creation. Liubov Popova was among the most important of these early pioneers. Her development as an artist was encouraged through private lessons and frequent travel, which brought her into contact with a broad range of historical examples, from Italian Renaissance art and Russian medieval icons to Cubism and other Western vanguard styles. In 1912 she went to Paris with fellow painter Nadezhda Udaltsova to study painting at the Académie de la Palette under André Dunoyer de Segonzac, Henri Le Fauconnier, and Jean Metzinger. There she mastered the Cubist idiom and was probably exposed to Italian Futurism, the two styles that would dominate her paintings of the next three and a half years.
      After returning to Moscow in 1913, she quickly emerged as one of the primary exponents of Russian Cubo-Futurism, an amalgam of the faceted planarity of Cubism and the formal energy of Futurist art. Birsk was completed near the end of her involvement with this style. Its crystalline structure is formally reminiscent of the views of houses in l’Estaque painted by Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso in 1908, but the vibrant palette attests to Popova’s sustained interest in Russian folk and decorative art. Birsk (1916, 106x70cm), one of the few landscapes from this stage of Popova’s career, was begun during a summer visit to the home of her former governess, who lived near the Ural Mountains in the small town of the painting’s title.
     The painting on the reverse of the same canvas, entitled (it's not clear why) Portrait of a Woman (1915, 106x71cm), shows Popova undertaking a subject that consistently occupied her during 1915: a figure situated in a Cubist-inspired composition. Although this work retains some representational elements, Popova’s gradual move away from representation is evident in her forceful application of an abstract visual vocabulary. By the end of 1916 Popova was completely devoted to abstraction, joining Kazimir Malevich’s Supremus group and creating paintings composed solely of dynamic geometric forms. These experiments in texture, rhythm, density, and color — which she called “painterly architectonics” — became the basis of her textile and theater designs of the 1920s. Like many of her Russian colleagues, Popova would ultimately renounce painting as obsolete and concern herself with the applied arts, which became synonymous with building a new society after the October Revolution.

LINKS
Objects (1915; 438x300pix, 31kb) _ The only readily recognizable object is a partially hidden guitar.
Architectonic Painting and Portrait (2 pictures on one page)
Composition with Figures (1913, 160x124cm; 650x500pix, 128kb) _ and also a guitar.
Sitzender weiblicher Akt (1914, 106x87cm)
Prozodezhda aktera No. 7 (The Magnanimous Cuckold: Actor no. 7, costume design, 1921) _ In the early twentieth century, avant-garde artists began exploring the forms and technologies of mass media. Beginning in 1909, the Italian Futurists rejected the past and glorified the age of the machine--cars, planes, speed, and war. Dada, dedicated to destroying the status quo, arose in Zurich in 1916 and then in New York, Berlin, and Paris, reacting against the absurdity and horror of World War I. Futurist and Dada poets scattered different styles and sizes of type across the page, using the techniques of advertising as literary devices. In Russia the Constructivists combined ideas from abstract painting with experimental typography in the early 1920s to create a new language of public address; Liubov' Popova's costume design at left for The Magnanimous Cuckold employs a red square as both a banner for social change and a functional element of costume.
The Traveler (1915, 142x105cm) _ In the early twentieth century, avant-garde women artists such as Popova, for the first time in history, became influential forces in directing the course of art. Between 1912 and 1914 she studied Cubism and non-objective art in Paris. The Traveler was painted when Popova was already deeply committed to a style of non-objective art. However, we still can discern recognizable forms linking the painting to the objective world — a woman wearing a yellow necklace and carrying a bright green umbrella. Glimpses of a railing, green grass, and a flag suggest the scenery through which she passes. The stenciled letters, an inheritance from the Cubist paintings of Braque and Picasso, are traditionally two-dimensional and help to emphasize the flatness of the picture plane.
Still Life (177kb)
Still Life with Instruments (1915, 94kb)
Architectonics in Painting (1917; 97kb)
— different Painterly Architectonic (1918, 97x71cm)
Traveler (322x240pix, 26kb)
Birsk (1916, 106x70cm; 573x383pix, 77kb) _ The artists of the Russian avant-garde were distinguished from their Western counterparts in many ways, particularly in the extraordinary number of women in their ranks who were responsible for discovering new bases of artistic creation. Liubov Popova was among the most important of these early pioneers. Her development as an artist was encouraged through private lessons and frequent travel, which brought her into contact with a broad range of historical examples, from Italian Renaissance art and Russian medieval icons to Cubism and other Western vanguard styles. In 1912 she went to Paris with fellow painter Nadezhda Udaltsova to study painting at the Académie de la Palette under André Dunoyer de Segonzac, Henri Le Fauconnier, and Jean Metzinger. There she mastered the Cubist idiom and was probably exposed to Italian Futurism, the two styles that would dominate her paintings of the next three and a half years.
      After returning to Moscow in 1913, she quickly emerged as one of the primary exponents of Russian Cubo-Futurism, an amalgam of the faceted planarity of Cubism and the formal energy of Futurist art. Birsk was completed near the end of her involvement with this style. Its crystalline structure is formally reminiscent of the views of houses in l’Estaque painted by Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso in 1908, but the vibrant palette attests to Popova’s sustained interest in Russian folk and decorative art. Birsk, one of the few landscapes from this stage of Popova’s career, was begun during a summer visit to the home of her former governess, who lived near the Ural Mountains in the small town of the painting’s title.
      Portrait of a Woman (1915, 106x71cm; 564x377pix, 70kb), the painting on the reverse of this one, shows Popova undertaking a subject that consistently occupied her during 1915: a figure situated in a Cubist-inspired composition. Although this work retains some representational elements, Popova’s gradual move away from representation is evident in her forceful application of an abstract visual vocabulary. By the end of 1916 Popova was completely devoted to abstraction, joining the Supremus group of Kazimir Malevich, and creating paintings composed solely of dynamic geometric forms. These experiments in texture, rhythm, density, and color, which she called “painterly architectonics”, became the basis of her textile and theater designs of the 1920s. Like many of her Russian colleagues, Popova would ultimately renounce painting as obsolete and concern herself with the applied arts, which became synonymous with building a new society after the October Revolution.
Utro (317x394pix, 44kb)
 
^ Born on 25 May 1764: Jan Frans van Dael, Flemish painter and lithographer, Specializes in Still Life and Flowers, who died on 20 March 1840.
— He first studied architecture at the Antwerp Academie from 1776, despite his early preference for painting, and in 1786 he settled in Paris as a decorator. In 1793 he acquired lodgings in the Louvre next to fellow countrymen Pierre-Joseph Redouté, Piat-Joseph Sauvage [1744–1818] and Gerard van Spaendonck; under the influence of Spaendonck he turned to flower painting, in which he specialized for the rest of his life. He was prolific in his output and successful in securing commissions from such wealthy and influential patrons as the Empresses Joséphine and Marie-Louise Bonaparte [1791–1847], and both Louis XVIII and Charles X.
      From 1793 until 1833 he exhibited regularly at the Paris Salon and, after 1807, occasionally in the Low Countries. Van Dael remained faithful to the Flemish tradition of flower painting exemplified by Roelandt Savery, with sober composition and attention to detail (e.g. Roses and Butterflies, 1802). But he also brought to many of his flower arrangements a French-inspired decorative monumentality. In some of his ornamental fruit and flower arrangements a landscape background is sketched in, and a few pure landscapes have survived, including The Painter’s House (1822). He painted a small number of religious and allegorical pictures; one of his most celebrated, Julie’s Tomb (1804), can be read as a reflection on life and death. He also painted occasional portraits, usually of other artists (e.g. Robert Lefèvre, 1804), and made lithographs (e.g. portrait of Jean-Baptiste Mauzaisse, 1829).
— Flemish by origin, Van Dael spent most of his life in France. He first studied architecture in his native Antwerp before going to Paris in 1786. There he was commissioned to assist in the trompe l'oeil decorations for the chateaux of Saint Cloud, Bellevue, and Chantilly. The influence of his master, Gerard van Spaendonck, was instrumental in Van Dael's decision to specialize in still life paintings of fruits and flowers, thereafter relegating interior decoration, portraits, religious subjects, and landscapes to raritiesin his ceuvre. He exhibited for the first time at the Salon of 1793, the same year he was given quarters at the Louvre. From 1806 to 1817 he lived at the Sorbonne as an artist protected by the State. Patronized by Louis XVIII and Charles X, as well as the empresses Josephine and Marie-Louise, Van Dael was decorated as a Knight of the Legion of Honor in 1825. He was interred in the cemetery of Pere Lachaise, next to his former teacher, Van Spaendonck. A highly successful painter who commanded high prices for his work, Van Dael taught a number of students who continued the northern tradition of flower painting.

LINKS
Flowers Before a Window(1789, 92x79cm; 1138x966pix, 198kb — ZOOM to 2276x1932pix, 666kb)
Fleurs dans un vase d'agate sur une table de marbre (rose, tulipe, iris, jacinthe, narcisse, oeillet) (1816, 84x66cm)
Fleurs sur une console de marbre avec un ananas (rose, tulipe, iris, jacinthe, narcisse, oeillet) (1823, 114x85cm)
Vase de Fleurs, Raisins, et Pêches (rose, pivoine, pavot) (1810, 99x79cm)
Flowerpiece (1811)
 

Died on a 25 May:


^ >1902 Franz Richard Unterberger, painter born on 15 August 1838 in Innsbruck, Austria. He was a student of the Munich Academy and later studied in Milan under Albert Zimmermann. He also studied in Düsseldorf under Andreas Achenbach. In 1860 Unterberger visited Norway and later settled in Brussels, where he followed the Belgian School. He also visited Southern France and Italy and made several visits to the coasts of England and Scotland. He died in the Paris suburb Neuilly-sur-Seine.
Vietri Sul Mare, Looking Towards Salerno (77 x 127 cm; _ ZOOMable)
A View in Venice, Rio S. Marina (82x70cm; _ ZOOMable)
Figures in a Village in the Dolomites ( _ ZOOMable)
Rio San Barnaba, Venezia (83x71cm) (_ ZOOM to 3000x2559pix, kb)
The view from the Balcony (84x72cm)
View to Saint Mark's Square, Venice (47x35cm)
Canale della Giudecca (1900, 83x71cm)
La Strada Monreale, Palermo (1884, 100x156cm)
Capri (1880, 92x137cm)
The Last Day Of The Harvest 1860, 72x112cm)
A View of Posilippo, Naples (82x70cm)
Amalfi (83.8 x 66 cm)
Amalfi, The Gulf Of Salerno (82x70cm)
— a different Amalfi, The Gulf Of Salerno (83x70cm)
The Amalfi Coast
Genoa (82x119cm)
Les Pêcheurs Sur La Terrasse (86x122cm)
Lac de Garde (53x81cm)
Rio San Geronimo, Venezia (83x71cm)
The Bay of Naples (83x71cm)
The Grand Canal, Venice (47x35cm)
Venise - Vue De S. George (57x111cm)
Schiavoni - Venidig (60x100cm; 378x640pix, 49kb)
Monaco
–- Fjord Landscape (56x86cm; 573x900pix, 40kb) —(070524)

^ 1699 Julien Franciscus de Geest, Flemish painter.
Vanitas Portrait of a Gentleman (1662, 43x36cm; 480x397pix, 12kb) —(060524)

^ 1689 Charles Errard (or Erard) de Bressuire fils, French painter, draftsman, architect, and writer, born in 1606. He first studied under Charles Errard père [1570–1630], a Mannerist portrait painter and engineer. From 1627 Erard fils was in Rome, working under the protection of François de Créqui, French Ambassador to the papal court. There he came into contact Claude Gellée and with an influential circle of scholars, artists and patrons, including Joachim von Sandrart, Paul Fréart, Sieur de Chantelou, secretary to the French Surintendant des Bâtiments du Roi, François Sublet des Noyers and Giovanni Pietro Bellori. During this period he made copies after paintings by Titian and Annibale Carracci and drawings of Roman antiquities, while learning the idealized, classicizing style that was upheld in academic circles. In 1633 he became a member of the Accademia di S Luca. He became one of the twelve founders of the French Académie royale de Peinture et de Sculpture. In 1666 he became the first director of the French Academy in Rome.
— Marsy and Claude Audran II were assistants of Erard fils, and Jean-Baptiste Corneille was his student.
Épisode de la Jérusalem délivrée (1639, 159x218cm; 471x650pix, 42kb)
Enée transportant Anchise (oval 144x85cm; 650x482pix, 43kb)
Renaud abandonnant Armide (1646, 242x337cm; 427x595pix, 50kb) —(060524)

^ 1648 Antoine Le Nain, French Baroque era painter born in 1588, who dies just two days after his brother Louis Le Nain [1505 – 23 May 1648], being survived by third brother Mathieu Le Nain “le Chevalier” [1607 – 20 Apr 1677]. All three worked together and their individual works cannot be distinguished. So you can read a lot MORE ON all 3 LE NAIN AT ART “4” MAY 23, date of the death of Louis.


Born on a 25 May:

^ 1882 Gottardo Guido Segantini, Swiss painter who died in 1974. Son of Giovanni Segantini [15 Jan 1858 – 28 Sep 1899] and brother of Mario Segantini. Like his father, Gottardo had another serious interest besides painting: manned flight. Among other designs he patented the Quadrotor Helicopter with a tractor propeller in front. A four-wheeled boxcar suspended from the rotor-carrying framework would accommodate pilot and passengers. The artist contracts with the engineer Kesselring of Zürich for the necessary calculations and the construction of an electrically powered model with 4 rotors of 2 m diameter each. In his mountain village of Maloya, Segantini established the "Aero Society Giovanni Segantini". Even though a German friend provided some money, Segantini was unable to raise the necessary 100'000 Swiss francs to realize and test full scale hardware of his father's and his own aircraft ideas.
–- Abendstimmung (1918, 70x60cm; 900x774pix, 101kb)
Frühling 1931 (1931, 70x50cm) _ Das vorliegende Gemälde zeigt den Kirchturm der katholischen Kirche von Maloja vor dem Piz Lagrev und ist somit ein charakteristisches Motiv aus Segantinis Heimat, das der Künstler mehrfach in verschiedenen Ansichten darstellte. Die Verwendung reiner Farben sowie von Schwarz und Weiss, die helle, auf dunkle Schlagschatten verzichtende Darstellungsweise und die divisionistische Maltechnik schaffen eine lichterfüllte, lebhafte Atmosphäre. _ The pseudonymous Simplono Condurro Nintendontini has transformed this picture into the amazing twin abstractions
      _ Fruit Line (2007; 775x1096pix, 260kb _ ZOOM to 1096x1550pix, 516kb _ ZOOM+ to 1700x2404pix, 1248kb _ ZOOM++ to 2636x3728pix, 3962kb) and
      _ Nine Teens and a Thirsty One (2007; 775x1096pix, 260kb _ ZOOM to 1096x1550pix, 516kb _ ZOOM+ to 1700x2404pix, 1248kb _ ZOOM++ to 2636x3728pix, 3962kb).
Ottobre alpestre (1920, 113x166cm; 428x640pix, kb)
Herbsttag am Silsersee (1921, 80x62cm; xpix, kb).
Malojersee (1959, 55x85cm; 413x640pix, 45kb).—(070524)

^ 1846 Gustave Jean Jacquet, French painter specialized in portraits of elegant women, who died in 1909.
A Noble Lady (91x77cm; _ ZOOMable)
The Recital (1898, 99x125cm)
An Elegant Lady in a Black Hat (1878, 107x72cm)
A Coquettish Smile (53x46cm)
A Quick Glance (30x24cm)
A Rare Beauty
An Elegant Lady with Pearls (42x32cm)
Dressed for the Ball (25x33cm)
La Coquette (61x81cm)
On The Hilltop (32x20cm)
Girl in a Red Dress (35x25cm)
Madame Roland (46x61cm)
Lovely Maiden (32x24cm; 480x352pix, 18kb)
Elegant Woman with Purple Ribbon (33x24cm; 480x345pix, 24kb)
Young Beauty with Red Hat (33x24cm)

^ 1841 Eugène-Samuel Grasset, Swiss-born French illustrator, decorative artist, and printmaker, who died on 23 October 1917. Before arriving in Paris in the autumn of 1871, Grasset had been apprenticed to an architect, attended the Polytechnic in Zürich and traveled to Egypt. In Paris he found employment as a fabric designer and graphic ornamentalist, which culminated in his first important project, the illustrations for Histoire des quatre fils Aymon (1883). Grasset worked in collaboration with Charles Gillot, the inventor of photo-relief printing and an influential collector of Oriental and decorative arts, in the production of this major work of Art Nouveau book design and of color photomechanical illustration. Grasset used a combination of medieval and Near Eastern decorative motifs to frame and embellish his illustrations, but most importantly he integrated text and imagery in an innovative manner which has had a lasting influence on book illustration. — Some of Grasset's students were Paul Follot, Augusto Giacometti, Pierre Roy, Eliseu Visconti, Paul Berthon.
— (Witches Flying Through Forest?) (670x700pix, 131kb) scared by wolves.
–- Tentation (1897, 61x61cm; 900x912pix, 106kb)
Chocolat Mexicain Masson 91 rue de Rivoli Paris (1892 color lithograph poster, 118x78cm; 576x388pix, 80kb) —(070524)
The Gleaners
>1795 André-Jacques-Victor Orsel, French painter who died on 01 November 1850. — {Hors selle Orsel chevauchait-il?}
–- The Pharaoh's Daughter Presents Moses to her Father (904x1220pix, 100kb) —(070524)

^ >1785 William Frederick Witherington, Britist artist who died on 10 April 1865. — {Was he weighed down by a withering ton of criticism? Did he answer it in a withering tone?}— LINKS
–- Harvesting, Near Derwentwater, Cumberland (1854, 68x97cm; 900x1310pix, 114kb)
The Village Post Office (1853, 61x91cm)
The Robin (76x64cm)
The Broken Pitcher (1814, 12x9cm)
— Going to School (1817, 12x9cm)
Stepping Stones on the Machno, North Wales - Study from Nature (1844, 63x76cm)
— Woodcutters (16x25cm)
The Hop Garland (1843, 45x36cm) _ During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries the hop gardens of Kent, Sussex and Surrey provided artists with a rich source of subject matter. The picking season, when many families migrated from London for paid employment and fresh air, was a modest English equivalent of the more exotic French and Italian grape harvest or vintage. Witherington was a popular painter of scenes from rural life. He painted several works inspired by the picturesque sights of hop-pickers at work and at play. Here he shows young workers at rest while they garland a younger companion with the yellow hop flowers. A writer in The Art Journal thought that this was Witherington's best picture.
— The Gleaners (12x9cm, 512x408pix, 21kb) [shown here >]


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