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DEATHS: 1980 STILL — 1953 GLEIZES — 1852 BRIULLOV
BIRTH: 1849 WEGUELIN
^ >Died on 23 June 1980: Clyfford E. Still, US Abstract Expressionist painter born on 30 November 1904. — {Is it true that when he said to a model: “Please be still,” she took it as a marriage proposal? Still less believable is the story of the moonshiner who still wanted a Still still still-life.} — {Unfortunately some people just can't stand Still.} — {Every one of his pictures was too dead to be called a Still life.}
— Still, born {not stillborn} in Grandin, North Dakota, attended Spokane University in Washington for a year in 1926 and again from 1931 to 1933. After graduation, he taught at Washington State College in Pullman until 1941. Still spent the summers of 1934 and 1935 at the Trask Foundation (now Yaddo) in Saratoga Springs, New York. From 1941 to 1943, he worked in defense factories in California. In 1943, his first solo show took place at the San Francisco Museum of Art, and he met Mark Rothko in Berkeley at this time. The same year, Still moved to Richmond, where he taught at the Richmond Professional Institute.
      When Still was in New York in 1945, Rothko introduced him to Peggy Guggenheim, who gave him a solo exhibition at her Art of This Century gallery in early 1946. Later that year, the artist returned to San Francisco, where he taught for the next four years at the California School of Fine Arts. Solo exhibitions of his work were held at the Betty Parsons Gallery, New York, in 1947, 1950, and 1951 and at the California Palace of the Legion of Honor, San Francisco, in 1947. In New York in 1948, Still worked with Rothko and others on developing the concept of the school that became known as the Subjects of the Artist. He resettled in San Francisco for two years before returning again to New York. In 1961, he settled on his farm near Westminster, Maryland. Still died in Baltimore {and he is still dead}.
— Attempting to free his work from the European tradition, Still began in the mid 1930s to paint semi-abstract pictures with residual imagery of figures or landscape. Worked 1941-1943 in war industries in California; made few paintings then but these showed further development towards abstraction. Taught from 1943-1945 at the Richmond Professional Institute, Richmond, Virginia, then moved to New York and became friendly with the artists developing towards Abstract Expressionism, especially Rothko and Pollock. Taught at the California School of Fine Arts in San Francisco 1946-50. Lived in New York again 1950-1961, working in increasing isolation. Declined all public exhibitions from 1952-1959, and in 1961 moved to Maryland, to work in tranquillity, away from the art world. Died in Baltimore.
— Although his best-known work is associated with Abstract Expressionism, he had established the basis for a strongly original style and outlook before any contact with New York art circles. His early life was divided between Washington state, where he was educated, and a prairie homestead in southern Alberta, Canada. Domestic tensions and the vicissitudes of farm life added an embattled note to his rugged though sensitive intellect. He was also deeply influenced by the vast flatness of the Canadian landscape, which became more desolate during an extended period of drought and depression after 1917. Early paintings such as the Row of Grain Elevators (1929) depict the agricultural environment of the prairies in a vigorous, somewhat crude manner reminiscent of Regionalism. Yet they also stress the symbolic polarities that the artist described as the ‘vertical necessity of life’ rising against the horizontal. Among other early stylistic traits were the reduction of form to essentials, compositions often structured around a central mass and the device of animating somber color schemes with bright accents.
“he was out of step with his time”“Still’s paintings are not for everyone”

LINKS
Jamais (May 1944, 165x82cm) _ Like some paintings of William Baziotes, Robert Motherwell, and Mark Rothko, Jamais dates from the formative, exploratory period of Abstract Expressionism. Although the influence of Surrealism pervaded the work of these artists in the early forties, they were moving toward distinctive independent styles.
     Until 1946–1947 the single upright figure dominated Clyfford Still’s painting. In its elongation and expressionistic distortion, this element is reminiscent of figures painted by Joan Miró and Pablo Picasso in the 1930s. Here the figure is barely particularized, appearing as a black flame or cleft in the blazing environment that surrounds it. Later it was to disappear entirely within the craggy, tenebrous abstractions for which Still is best known. The sphere, which interrupts the thrusting verticality of his tense lines in several of these early works, was also to vanish. Concern with the contrast of light and dark was to become increasingly important and was emphasized by jarring color juxtapositions. The canvas, already large in this example, was to reach monumental proportions and create an impact rivaling that of the viewer’s own environment.
     The present painting is one of the few by Still bearing its original title. He disdained titles, and discarded those he had given to early works because he considered that they too strongly influenced the observer’s experience of the painting. Indeed, Jamais lends an air of finality and melancholy to this scene and encourages one to read the figure as howling in protest or despair above a setting sun.
July 1945-R (800x362pix, 69kb) a rope falling in the gap between two cliffs?
1946-H (Indian Red and Black) (1946, 199x174cm)
1948 _ By 1947, Still had begun working in the format that he would intensify and refine throughout the rest of his career—a large-scale color field crudely applied with palette knives. Still liberated color from illusion-ary design by allowing large, uninterrupted tonal areas to interlock on a flat plane. He dispensed with typically “beautiful” colors in favor of more disquieting hues to create unsettling impressions. In 1948, visceral smears of brown, mustard, and dark crimson impasto seem to spread beyond the canvas. The painting’s soaring scale and the energy of the roughly painted crags suggest the boundlessness the artist revered. The patches of earth tones in many canvases, including 1948, have been interpreted as organic shapes: parched riverbeds, frozen wastelands, swamps, and even flayed skin. Wishing to avoid the possibility of such associations, Still left his paintings untitled, or identified them simply by the year of their creation. Evocative titles, in the artist’s opinion, might influence the viewer’s experience as they contemplate the palpable tension and sense of the infinite that can be found within the canvas.
     Still espoused what he regarded as particularly of the US ideals such as absolute freedom and individuality, which were manifested in his works as well as in his artistic career. Although he was given solo exhibitions at Peggy Guggenheim’s Art of This Century gallery in 1946 and Betty Parson’s Gallery in 1947, he disdained the commercial aspects of the art world and became increasingly aloof from the burgeoning New York School, to the point of refusing to exhibit for a period between 1952 and 1958. Although the artist scorned categorization, his expansive can-vases dominated by jagged fields of color were influential among the Abstract Expressionist artists he was grouped with, in particular Barnett Newman and Mark Rothko, who shared his interest in the metaphysical sublime. These artists believed that a painting could convey meaning without reference to anything outside of its inherent formal and material qualities. Rather than capture a realistic representation of the world in his abstract paintings, Still sought to create a transcendental experience that was purely visual and impossible to describe with words.
[still more blotches] (1948, 179x158cm) _ {this site is not responsible for the ridiculous opinions dished out here} By 1947, Clyfford Still had begun working in the format that he would intensify and refine throughout the rest of his career—a large-scale color field crudely applied with palette knives. Still liberated color from illusionary design by allowing large, uninterrupted tonal areas to interlock on a flat plane. He dispensed with typically “beautiful” colors in favor of more disquieting hues to create unsettling impressions. In 1948, visceral smears of brown, mustard, and dark crimson impasto seem to spread beyond the canvas. The painting’s soaring scale and the energy of the roughly painted crags suggest the boundlessness the artist revered. The patches of earth tones in many canvases, including 1948, have been interpreted as organic shapes: parched riverbeds, frozen wastelands, swamps, and even flayed skin. Wishing to avoid the possibility of such associations, Still left his paintings untitled, or identified them simply by the year of their creation. Evocative titles, in the artist’s opinion, might influence the viewer’s experience as they contemplate the palpable tension and sense of the infinite that can be found within the canvas {blah..blah..blah}. Still espoused what he regarded as particularly of the US ideals such as absolute freedom and individuality, which were manifested in his works as well as in his artistic career. Although he was given solo exhibitions at Peggy Guggenheim’s Art of This Century gallery in 1946 and Betty Parson’s Gallery in 1947, he disdained the commercial aspects of the art world and became increasingly aloof from the burgeoning New York School, to the point of refusing to exhibit for a period between 1952 and 1958. Although the artist scorned categorization, his expansive canvases dominated by jagged fields of color were influential among the Abstract Expressionist artists he was grouped with, in particular Barnett Newman and Mark Rothko, who shared his interest in the metaphysical sublime. These artists believed that a painting could convey meaning without reference to anything outside of its inherent formal and material qualities. Rather than capture a realistic representation of the world in his abstract paintings, Still sought to create a transcendental experience that was purely visual and impossible to describe with words {at least not with words that can be repeated in polite society}{similar drivel is written about paintings by chimps and elephants}.
–- untitled (Fear) (1945, 67x51cm; 1100x845pix, 57kb) _ “By 1941, space and figure in my canvases had been resolved into a total psychic entity, freeing me from the limitations of each, yet fusing into an instrument bounded only by the limits of my energy and intuition. My feeling of freedom was now absolute and infinitely exhilarating.'' Clyfford Still, 1963 In statements about his work, Still referred to painting as an ``instrument’’ and believed that art was a total idea, encompassing life and death, freedom and subjugation. Still saw art as influential in society and it was the artist’s responsibility to use the instrument of paint as a confrontation with his inner self and with society as a whole. Like Mark Rothko and Barnett Newman, Still considered art to have a transformative potential that could impact the public in transcendent and deeply emotive ways. Still sought to achieve the ecstatic through primal forms that abandoned the human figure as subject matter, leaving the human gesture of paint to signify the human presence in art. In the mid-1940s, with works such as Untitled (Fear), Still arrived at his unique mature style of abstraction that achieved a fusion of color and form that aimed at momentous content and sublime beauty. By eliminating figuration or narrative intent from his compositions, Still orchestrated his strokes and surfaces toward his real subject matter, which is the dramatic interaction of painted forms and color harmonies. His jutting forms and muscular shards of color are redolent with a sense of crescendo within an organic formation that fills the picture plane and intimates a continuation beyond. Still’s forms and painterly expression were in perfect sync with his foreboding and unusual palette. Still, in an acknowledgement of Edmund Burke’s theory of color, employed melancholic colors such as black, brown or deep purple to access the Sublime, yet he also knew the value of expanding his palette to include the lighter colors of orange, red or yellow to animate the composition and increase its expressiveness. In Untitled (Fear), the counterpoints of color - the flickering red, touch of blue, outlines of white and wisps of yellow - harmonize with the more somber ground, and fulfill the artist’s intent to highlight the paradox of light within dark in which radiance is a means of revelation of the Sublime.
     _ The pseudonymous Mountriver Fijet has combined this and the next two pictures and transformed them into the twin abstractions
      _ Panting Fear (2007; 550x778pix, 68kb _ ZOOM to 778x1100pix, 130kb _ ZOOM+ to 1100x1556pix, 259kb _ ZOOM++ to 1710x2418pix, 673kb _ ZOOM+++ to 2658x3760pix, 1458kb) and
      _ Fear of Pain in Tin (2007; 550x778pix, 68kb _ ZOOM to 778x1100pix, 130kb _ ZOOM+ to 1100x1556pix, 259kb _ ZOOM++ to 1710x2418pix, 673kb _ ZOOM+++ to 2658x3760pix, 1458kb)
Painting (800x728pix, 59kb) mostly flat black, with streaks of colors at the left and right edges.
S ???Painting (800x671pix, 102kb) almost all dark violet background, with four thin drippy traces, red, yellow, white, and blue.
SPainting with Red Letter S (573x800pix, 61kb) Solid black background with mostly yellow (plus a little white) drippy areas, and a tiny red spot that is too small in the image to tell whether it is an S, or anything else besides a tiny red spot. Here it is, on the right, magnified 10x >>>
      And, for the sake of comparison, the pseudonymous Hylbrook Yet has provided, on the left, this image, also magnified 10x, of his
      _ Portrait of a True Red Letter S [<<<]; as a bonus Yet contributes yet more:
      _ The Ubiquitous Little Red x, right here: + ZOOM IN + It is full size but you can click on it to zoom in on a 50x enlargement.

       Not content with that, Yet has
transformed Still's poor pretense of art into the maximalist
 S 
      _ Huge Red Letter S Enclosing Five Lesser Letters aka Stew Dip (2006; screen filling, 241kb _ ZOOM to 1864x2636pix, 2016kb) as well as the minimalist
      _ Visible S shown here full size >>>

untitled (800x563pix, 73kb)
—(070622)
^ Born on 23 June 1849: John Reinhard Weguelin, British painter of genre, classical, biblical and historical subjects, who died on 28 April 1927. — {Whenever there was the least opening into an art show, could Weguelin wiggle in?}
— Born the son of a vicar of South Stoke, near Arundel in Sussex, who had presumably turned Roman Catholic, he was educated at Cardinal Newman’s Oratory School in Edgbaston. Weguelin began working as a Lloyds underwriter but then studied at the Slade under Poynter and Legros. He exhibited landscapes and biblical and classical subjects in the manner of Alma-Tadema. He illustrated several volumes of poems, translations and stories. Studied at the Slade School under Poynter and Legros. Exhibited from 1877 at the Royal Academy, Society of British Artists, Grosvenor Gallery, New Gallery and elsewhere. Titles at the RA including The Labour of the Danaids (1878), ' (1884) and The Piper and the Nymphs (1897). Painted exclusively in watercolor after 1893, and was elected to the Royal Society of Painters in Watercolor in 1897. Lived for a time at Hastings. In 1996, in Chepstow, south Wales, the BBC's Antiques Roadshow discovered a picture by Weguelin entitled Mermaids (1910).

LINKS
Lesbia (1878; 700x430pix, 76kb)
Pressing Grapes (1880, 114x76cm; 51kb) _ This painting was discovered in a private home in Portland, Maine, in 1997 and auctioned the same year by Barridoff Galleries for $27'600. The artist was unknown at the time of auction but was later discovered to be Weguelin, better known for his famous painting Lesbia.
The obsequies of an Egyptian cat (1886, 83x128cm; 662x1050pix, 100kb)
A Young Girl with Flamingoes (21kb)
A Pastoral Scene (35kb)
The Bath (31kb)
Bacchus and the Choir of Nymphs (33kb)
Bacchus Triumphant (24kb)
The Labour of the Danaïdes (23kb) _ The fifty daughters of Danaüs, King of Argos, were commanded in obedience to a prophecy to murder their husbands on their wedding night; all but one obeyed, and were punished by having to draw water in sieves from a deep well, or by pouring it endlessly into a vessel from which it continually escaped.
 
^ Died on 23 (24?) June 1953: Albert Gleizes, French Cubist painter, printmaker, and writer, born on 08 December 1881. — {What were the ingredients of Gleizes' glazes?}
— He grew up in Courbevoie, a suburb of Paris, and as a student at the Collège Chaptal became interested in theatre and painting. At 19, his father put him to work in the family interior design and fabric business, an experience that contributed to a lifelong respect for skilled workmanship. The first paintings he exhibited, at the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts in Paris in 1902, were Impressionist in character, but the work accepted within two years at the Salon d’Automne showed a shift to social themes, a tendency that accelerated until 1908.
     Compulsory military service from 1903 to 1905 thrust him into the company of working-class people, arousing a permanent sense of solidarity with their aspirations and needs. The results were immediately apparent in the Association Ernest Renan, which he helped to establish in 1905, a kind of popular university with secular and socialist aims. He was also one of the founders of a community of intellectuals based near Paris, the Abbaye de Créteil, which functioned from November 1906 to February 1908. He remained interested during these years in social art, but his paintings became flatter and more sombre, more simplified and with an increased emphasis on structure.
     Through the circle of poets associated with the Abbaye de Créteil, Gleizes met Henri Le Fauconnier, whose portrait of Pierre-Jean Jouve (1909) made a decisive impression on him, confirming his exploration of volume. His friends soon included Jean Metzinger and Robert Delaunay, with whom he exhibited alongside Le Fauconnier and Fernand Léger at the Salon d’Automne in 1910; the critic Louis Vauxcelles wrote disparagingly of their ‘pallid’ cubes. The five artists, plus Marie Laurencin, encouraged by Guillaume Apollinaire, Roger Allard, Alexandre Mercereau and Jacques Nayral, determined to group themselves together at the Salon des Indépendants in 1911. Manipulating the rules and helping to elect Le Fauconnier chairman of the hanging committee, they showed together in a separate room, marking the emergence of Cubism. Gleizes’s portrait of Jacques Nayral (1911, 162x114cm), one of his first major Cubist works, dates from this period. — Gleizes' students included Dorrit Black, Evie Hone, Mainie Jellett, Tarsila.
— Gleizes was born in Paris. He worked in his father’s fabric design studio after completing secondary school. While serving in the army from 1901 to 1905, Gleizes began to paint seriously. He exhibited for the first time at the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts, Paris, in 1902, and participated in the Salon d’Automne in 1903 and 1904.
      With several friends, including the writer René Arcos, Gleizes founded the Abbaye de Créteil outside Paris in 1906. This utopian community of artists and writers scorned bourgeois society and sought to create a nonallegorical, epic art based on modern themes. The Abbaye closed in 1908 due to financial difficulties. In 1909 and 1910 Gleizes met Robert Delaunay, Henri Le Fauconnier, Fernand Léger, and Jean Metzinger. In 1910 he exhibited at the Salon des Indépendants, Paris, and the Jack of Diamonds in Moscow. The following year he wrote the first of many articles. In collaboration with Metzinger, Gleizes wrote Du cubisme, published in 1912. The same year Gleizes helped found the Section d’Or.
      In 1914 Gleizes again saw military service. His paintings had become abstract by 1915. Travels to New York, Barcelona, and Bermuda during the next four years influenced his stylistic evolution. His first solo show was held at the Galeries Dalmau, Barcelona, in 1916. Beginning in 1918 Gleizes became deeply involved in a search for spiritual values, as reflected in his painting and writing. In 1927 he founded Moly-Sabata, another utopian community of artists and craftsmen, in Sablons. His book La Forme et l’histoire (1932) examines Romanesque, Celtic, and Oriental art. In the 1930s Gleizes participated in the Abstraction-Création group. Later in his career Gleizes executed several large commissions, including the murals for the Paris World’s Fair of 1937. In 1947 a major Gleizes retrospective took place in Lyons at the Chapelle du Lycée Ampère. From 1949 to 1950 Gleizes worked on illustrations for Pascal’s Pensées. He executed a fresco, Eucharist, for the chapel Les Fontaines at Chantilly in 1952. Gleizes died in Avignon.

LINKS
–- S*#> Self-Portrait (510x452pix, 69kb)
–- S*#> Untitled (900x724pix, 148kb) Cubist man and woman meet during rainstorm in the city?
–- S*#> Composition (1322x900pix, 345kb)
–- Composition Cubiste (1165x1177pix, 109kb) his idea of a landscape with a house in the middle.
— different /S#*>Composition Cubiste (900x664pix, 173kb) features the words BAR and VIN, almost monochrome light brown.
–- George Valmier (06 Aug 1915; 1184x1102pix, 167kb) hasty colored sketch _ The painter Valmier [04 Apr 1885 – 25 Mar 1937] seems to have suffered a terrible accident that left him disfigured and covered with paints of various colors.
Le dépiquage des moissons (1912, 687x886pix, 25kb)
Le Village (1915; 1079x1416pix, 133kb)
Toile pour la contemplation (1942; 1102x659pix, 29kb)
Lumière (1934; 2019x1395pix, 247kb)
Peinture à sept éléments (1943)
La Dame aux bêtes (Madame Raymond Duchamp-Villon) (Feb 1914, 196x114cm; 573x331pix, 59kb) _ As in a number of his other paintings of this period, Gleizes depicts a domestic interior scene in a self-consciously “modern” style. Here the seated woman is the wife of Raymond Duchamp-Villon, the sculptor who took part in the discussions of the Cubist group at Puteaux during the early teens. She is portrayed as the epitome of bourgeois complacency, in a large armchair, with her dog and two cats, sensible tie shoe, wedding band, and string of beads. Typically Cubist elements are the fusion of figure and ground, the frontal, centralized pose, the multiple views of the sitter’s face, the choppy brushstrokes defining and shading planes, and the patterning of areas to resemble collage. Futurist devices are the repetition of form to describe movement (the dog’s wagging tail) and planar intersections and force lines meant to express notions of the dynamic interpenetration of matter and atmosphere.
—(070622)
^ >Died on 23 June (11 June Julian) 1852: Karl Pavlovich Briullov (or Bryullov, Bruloff, Brullov, Brullov, Brioullov, “Charles Bouleau”), Russian Neoclassical and Romantic painter specialized in Portraits, born on 23 December (12 December Julian) 1799 of French parents in St. Petersburg.
—       He was called by his contemporaries The Great Karl. His masterpiece
      _ The Last Day of Pompeii (1833), an enormous composition painted in Italy in 1830-1833, was a real triumph. Italian critics compared Briulloff to the greatest artists of the past, such as Rubens, Rembrandt, and Van Dyke. At the age of 33 Briulloff gained European fame.
      Karl Briulloff (Charles Brulleau until 1822, when the family name was changed according to Russian pronunciation) was born in 1799 in St. Petersburg into a family of painters: his great grand-father, his grand-father, his father and his two elder brothers Fedor and Alexander were artists. In 1809-1821, Karl studied art in the Academy of Arts in St. Petersburg. One of his early notable pictures
      _ Narcissus (1819), created while studying in the Academy, was implemented in the principles of Classicism, which he was taught. Briulloff graduated from the Academy with honors and was sent along with his brother Alexander to Italy to study art on scholarships from the Society for the Promotion of Artists.
      He spent in Italy 13 years, studying art of the ancient Italy, copying the antiques in the museums and making a lot of drawings in the streets of Rome. He painted portraits, both ceremonial and intimate ones, and created series of genre scenes of everyday Roman life. The most important of his genre works was
      _ Italian Midday (1827). In Italy Briulloff created over 120 portraits in various techniques. Among them are portraits of the Russian aristocracy, residing in Italy, as well as painters, sculptors, writers, etc., and also Italian statesmen and artists. Among the most notable are portraits of Grand Duchess Elena Pavlovna,
      _ Prince G. Gagarin,
      _ Countess Yu. Samoilova and
      _ her foster children,
      _ Princess Z. Volkonskaya,
      _ Bruloff's brother Alexander, A. Lvov, Architect K. A. Ton, Italian singers
      _ Juditta Pasta and
      _ Fanny Persiani-Tacinardi  and many others. He also painted several
      _ self-portraits.
      In 1835, Briulloff returned to Russia. In the years that followed he painted mostly portraits. Among the best portraits of this period are those of
      _ Author Nestor Kukolnic,
      _ Count A. A. Perovsky (the Author Anton Pogorelsky) and his nephew future
      _ Poet and Playwright Alexey Tolstoy,
      _ Author A. N. Strugovshchikov,
      _ Princess Ye. P. Saltykova,
      _ Countess Yu. P. Samoylova.
      In 1849, Briulloff had to come to Italy again for his deteriorating health, which was due to his unhappy marriage and his hard work on the paintings of St. Isaac's Cathedral in St. Petersburg, which he was unable to finish. He spent one year on Madeira, the climate of each was believed to be beneficial for the patients with heart diseases, and his last two years in Rome. He created several excellent works during these years, including portraits of members of Tittoni family, with whom he was very close. He died in Rome.
        Also see Briulloff's portrait by Vasily Tropinin.

LINKS
Self-Portrait (1833)
Self-Portrait (1848)
Self-portrait in a Boat with Baroness Ye. N. Meller-Zakomelskaya and a Girl (unfinished, 1835)
Alexander Bruloff (1827)
Sylvester Shchedrin (1824)
Alexey Tolstoy as a Youth (1836)
Count A. A. Perovsky (the writer “Anton Pogorelsky”) _ the sitter (1789-1836) was an illegitimate son of Count Alexey Razumovsky, brother of Count Vasily Perovsky [Perovsky portrait by Kiprensky]. He was the author of the well known novel for children "Black Hen, or Underground People". He raised his nephew Count Alexey Tolstoy (1817-1875), who became a well known poet and playwright, the author of several poems and famous plays Death of Ivan the Terrible, Tzar Feodor Ivanovich and Tzar Boris.
Nestor Kukolnic (1836) _ Kukolnic (1809-1868) was a Russian poet and playwright. This portrait was very popular and was mentioned in Demons by F. Dostoevsky [Dostoevsky portrait by Perov].
A. N. Strugovshchikov (1840) _ Strugovshchikov (1808-1878) was a Russian poet and translator from German (Goethe and Schiller), also a publisher.
Alexander Briulloff, architect and painter. (not later then 1841)
The Last Day of Pompeii (1833) _ detail 1 (group at left pelted by falling household objects and a rain of stones) _ detail 2 (couple with child and baby) _ detail 3 (child by dead mother) _ detail 4 (rider on rearing horse, behind Pliny and his mother) _   One of the requirements of the Society for the Promotion of Artists scolarships was to paint a big historical picture. In 1827, Briulloff visited the excavation site of Pompeii, a town destroyed and buried in hot lava during an eruption of Volcano Vesuvius on 24 August 0079 A.D. Briulloff was deeply impressed when he saw the town, preserved under the layer of lava, where life was suddenly stopped. Six years were to pass between the first conception and its realization. After his first sketches, Briulloff began studying the materials of the excavations and historical documents, such as the letters of Pliny the Younger, who was an eye-witness of the event. It is believed that the son persuading his mother to come with him in the right part of the picture is Pliny with his mother. The Last Day of Pompeii [a more accurate name would be “The Last Hour of Pompeii”] had a huge success in Italy.
Rider: portrait of Giovanina and Amacilia Pacini, the Foster Children of Countess Samoilova (1832) _ detail 1 (younger sister Amacilia looking on admiringly) _ detail 2 (older sister Giovanina riding)
Countess Samoilova and Her Ward Amacilia Pacini Leaving a Ball (_ ZOOM to 2002x1400pix, 691kb) (not later than 1842) _ detail 1 (Amacilia) _ detail 2 (the countess) _ Countess Yulia Samoilova (née Palen, 1803-1875) was a wealthy heiress. After her first marriage to Count N. Samoilov, which ended with permanent separation, she traveled all over Europe, living mostly in Italy and Paris. She met Briulloff in Rome and they fell in love. She supported him all his life and he painted a lot of her portraits. We can see her face in The Last Day of Pompeii as the mother embracing two daughters (lower left corner), and as the dead woman in the center of the picture and several others.
–- S*#> A Gentleman Seated in Roman Ruins (1826, 34x26cm; 510x397pix, 56kb)
— 24 images at russianpaintings.net
—(080608)

Died on a 23 June:


1944 Arthur Segal, Romanian painter born (main coverage) on 13 June 1875. —(060609)

>1913 Marc-Louis-Emmanuel Solon aka Louis-Marc-Emmanuel Solon [1835–], French pottery artist. — Father of Léon-Albert-Victor Solon [1872–1957], ceramicist, painter, illustrator, and poster designer.. —(090907)

^ 1799 Jan-Anton (or -Anthonie) Garemijn (or Gaeremyn), Bruges Flemish painter and draftsman born on 15 April 1712. He was apprenticed to Roch Aerts [–1739], continued his training at the Bruges Académie and later studied under Louis Roose [1701–1765] and the sculptor Hendrik Pulinx. However, his characteristic style, evident from 1730, owed most to Jacob Beernaert. Matthias de Visch [1702–1765], whom he succeeded as director of the Académie, introduced Garemijn to the graceful Italian style and to the mannered drawing-room scenes typical of the French masters Antoine Watteau [bap. 10 Oct 1684 – 18 Jul 1721] and François Boucher [29 Sep 1703 – 30 May 1770].
     The Rococo was not an interesting period in Bruges painting or that of Flanders in general. Few works in this style sustain the quality achieved by Flemish artists in other periods. Jan Antoon Garemijn is the only Bruges painter to rise above mediocrity with his lively technique. He has been called, somewhat chauvinistically and flatteringly, the Flemish Boucher. In reality, he was a cheerful, popular narrator and talented craftsman, fascinated by the picturesque, coarse or even grotesque detail. Garemijn modelled his style on that of the genre painters of the seventeenth century, especially David Teniers. He was frequently asked to decorate dining rooms and salons, many of which survive in their original condition in stately homes and castles. Garemijn's lone masterpiece is the Digging of the Ghent Canal (1753). The gigantic scene is not only important from the sociological and historical point of view, but is also an artistic tour de force. We have to go back over two centuries to find a similarly populous panorama in the shape of Albrecht Altdorfer's Battle of Issus (1529).
Garden of the Willaeys-Vleys Family at Groeninge, Bruges (1759, 178x92cm rounded top; 1282x702pix, 128kb) _ The painting shows the rear of the Gruuthuse mansion and the gardens of Eeckhout Abbey.
The Pandreitje in Bruges (1778, 80x109cm; 780x1064pix, 147kb) The Pandreitje was used as a vegetable market. Here meat-sellers occupy the portico of the prison building.
Aushebung des Genter Kanals (1753; 425x331pix, 38kb)

^ 1781 Pierre Louis Dumesnil the Younger, French painter born in 1698. — Interior with Card Players (79x98cm) _ The theatrical effect created by the firelight and candles is typical of the work of Dumesnil, who was professor and rector of the French Académie and exhibited at the Salons from 1751 until 1774.

1677 Willem van Herp, Flemish painter born in 1614. — {Did he paint reptiles?}— He collaborated with Damian Wortelmans and Hans Birmns. His style is similar to that of Rubens and is influenced by David Teniers II. He painted some paintings in collaboration with Rubens, and works of van Herp are sometimes mistakenly attributed to Rubens.
The Mocking of Christ (107x159cm; 509x756pix, 124kb)
Ecce Homo (108x159cm; 456x677pix, 58kb)
The Archangel Saint Gabriel Defeating the Rebellious Angels (65x86cm)
Saint Anthony of Padua distributing Bread (1662; 544x750pix, 42kb) _ The friars on the left are Franciscan and the one with the halo in the center is Saint Anthony of Padua. The poor on the right, who receive bread from the Franciscans, include two pilgrims.
–- The Flight into Egypt (69x103cm; 942x1398pix, 113kb) _ The painting depicts the Holy Family as they enter Egypt, and includes an incident not recorded in the canonical gospels: when they passed idols on their entrance into Eygpt, the statues broke and fell (as suggested by a prophecy in Isaiah 19:1). _ Compare
      _ The Flight into Egypt (1500; 1568x2384pix, 2935kb) by Vittore Carpaccio [1460-1526], and The Flight into Egypt (links) by many other painters.
–- Triumph of the Eucharist over the Idolators (70x88cm; 1110x1398pix, 91kb)
–- Via Dolorosa (56x72cm; 1018x1398pix, kb)
–- The Bilocation of Saint Anthony of Padua (78x110cm; 1132x1575pix, 123kb) _ This depicts an episode from the legend of Saint Anthony of Padua [1195 – 13 Jun 1231] (reputed to be THE saint whose intercession is most likely to help find lost objects). The father of Saint Anthony had been falsely accused of the murder of a young nobleman. In order to defend his father and uphold his innocence, Saint Anthony found himself miraculously transported from his residence at the convent of Arcella (near Padua) to the courtroom in Lisbon where his father was standing trial. Declaring his father innocent of the murder he pronounced that “the murdered man shall bear witness as to the truth of my testimony”. The moment depicted here shows in the background the raising of the murdered man and in the foreground the moment of his testimony.
–- The Repentance of David at the Death of Uriah (88x105cm; 889x1075pix, 187kb _ .ZOOM to 1555x1881pix, 354kb)
–- S*#> A Family Feasting and Dancing (80x115cm; 510x766pix, 87kb) _ This elaborate merry company is typical of Herp. He is thought to have started to paint them during the 1650s, but probably continued to produce them in the succeeding decade. Most of his genre pictures are known in numerous versions; the present composition, one of his most successful, appears to be unique.
–- The Blessing of Jacob (594x892pix, 42kb). —(080622)


Born on a 23 June:


1856 Vincenzo Caprile, Italian artist who died in 1936.

1845 Émile Renouf, French artist who died on 04 May 1894.

^ 1816 Henri Charles Antoine Baron, French painter and illustrator who died on 13 September 1885. — [Napoléon III aurait dû l'ennoblir, il aurait été le baron Baron...] — He was a student of Jean Gigoux in Paris c. 1835 and traveled through Italy with him and François-Louis Français. He made his début at the Salons of 1837 and 1838 with Under the Willows (1837) and Macbeth and the Witches in collaboration with Français and showing the paintings under Français’ name. Baron emerged as a reputable painter of genre and idyllic scenes, painting fanciful scenes, often set in Renaissance Venice. His rather precious style and romantic, dashing subject-matter won him lasting success with a clientele much enamoured of facile compositions. Such works included Sculpture Studio (1840), Fêtes galantes (1845) and La mère de famille (1847). Baron paid homage to several famous painters in such anecdotal works as An Evening with Giorgione (1844) and Andrea del Sarto Painting (1847). Among other works were the spirited Wedding of Gamache (1849) and Cabaret Scene (1859), purchased by Napoleon III. Baron also illustrated books, including François de Salignac de la Mothe-Fénelon’s Aventures de Télémaque (1846), and he collaborated on La Peau de chagrin (1838) of Honoré de Balzac [1799-1850] and an edition of Boccaccio’s Decameron. With Français and Célestin Nanteuil [1813–1873] he also produced the three-volume Les Artistes anciens et modernes (1848–1862), a collection of lithographs after works by contemporary artists.

1688 Jacob Laurenszoon van der Vinne, Haarlem Dutch Mennonite painter and engraver who died on 17 January 1737. He was the brother of painters-engravers Vincent Laurenszoon van der Vinne II [1686–1742] and Jan Laurenszoon van der Vinne [1699–1753]. They were sons of Laurens Vincentszoon van der Vinne [1658-1729], and nephews of Jan Vincentszoon van der Vinne “des Nageoires” [03 February 1663 – 01 Mar 1721] and Izaak Vincentszoon van der Vinne [1665–1740]. The father of the last three was Vincent Laurenszoon van der Vinne I [11 Oct 1628 or 1629 – 26 Jul 1702], best known for his travel diaries and sketches. Jacob's son Laurens Jacobszoon van der Vinne would become a flower painter. Two of Jacob’s nephews, Jan Janszoon van der Vinne [1734–1805] and Vincent Janszoon van der Vinne [31 Jan 1736 – 15 Jan 1811], seem to have been the last artists active in the family. I find on the internet a couple of examples of the work of Vincent Laurenszoon van der Vinne, but if anyone of the others vas really a vinne, vhy isn't there any sample of his vork in the vorld vide veb?

^ 1675 Louis Silvestre (or de Silvestre), French painter who died on 11 April 1760. He was first apprenticed to his father, engraver Israel Silvestre the Younger [03 Aug 1621 – 11 Oct 1691]. Louis went on to study under Charles Le Brun and then Bon Boullogne. In 1694 Silvestre competed unsuccessfully for the Prix de Rome but left nevertheless for Italy. In Rome he met Carlo Maratti; he also visited Venice and Piedmont. On his return to Paris he was received (reçu) in 1702 into the Académie Royale, presenting the Creation of Man by Prometheus. He embarked on a successful career, earning academic honors (he was appointed an assistant professor in 1704 and a full professor in 1706) and commissions from both the Church and the court. In 1703 he was commissioned by the guild of Paris goldsmiths to make the May of Notre-Dame (Healing of the Sick). In 1709 he painted a Last Supper for the chapel at Versailles. This was followed by nine scenes from the Life of St Benedict (1709) for St Martin-des-Champs, and a Saint Matthew (1710; destroyed in 1748) for the cupola of St Roch, both in Paris. Among the secular works of his early career are the paintings originally intended for the Pavillon de la Ménagerie at Versailles, including Arion Playing the Lyre (1701), and Hector Taking Leave of Andromache with its pendant Ulysses Taking Astyanax away from Andromache, painted in 1708 for Armand-Gaston I de Rohan-Soubise [1674–1749]. Silvestre also painted contemporary historical subjects (e.g. Battle of Kassel and Siege of Saint Omer) for the funeral of Philippe I, Duc d’Orléans [–1701]. — Giovanni Battista Casanova was a student of Silvestre.
Portrait of Silvestre (597x475pix, 52kb) by La Tour _ Preparatory sketch (1753; 32x21cm; 479x314pix, 42kb) _ Comparison detail (preparatory sketch and final painting side by side)
Portrait of Silvestre (1753, 73x60cm) by Jean-Baptiste Greuze
Prinz Maximilian Emanuel Franz Joseph von Bayern (1707; 1538x1205pix, 251kb) playing the viola da gamba.
Friedrich August I (1018x819pix, 163kb) half length _ Friedrich August I., Kurfürst von Sachsen und als August II. König von Polen (1670-1733), war für seine Mätressenwirtschaft und für seine opulenten Hoffeste berühmt.
Friedrich August I (642x374pix, 39kb) full length
Jean de Bodts (1729; 574x440pix, 198kb gif)
An Allegory of Music (300x238pix, 9kb)
ZOOM to 4x

Happened on a 23 June:

2007 In the Vogelherdhöhle, Germany, prehistoric site, the oldest known work of art is discovered: a 35'000 years old, 37mm long, 7.5 gram mammoth carved out of mammoth ivory [full size photo >] —(080622).

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updated Monday 07-Sep-2009 16:50 UT
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